With colleges closed, exams postponed and admissions either delayed or called-off, COVID-19 has disrupted the education system, presenting several hurdles for international students around the world. As the pandemic wreaks havoc everywhere, international students and parents are weighing options on overseas university education. For students who have put their studying abroad plans on hold, we have come up with some good news that can end your admission woes. Calm down. The news is not as bad as it initially appeared.

For students applying for Fall 2020

Extended College Admission Dates.
May 1 is the deadline for schools to accept admissions, but it seems like the pandemic has created a lot of uncertainty. The deadline to respond has been extended to June 1, 2020, and schools are set to open in August 2020 for the Fall Semester.

Some schools have also started accepting Pass/Fail grades for high school students. Students will be allowed to pursue their courses online or partake in studies at the campus. If the outbreak doesn’t cause further restrictions, all schools will start lessons in between August – January 2021.

A blessing in disguise for Waitlist Candidates
Experts are predicting a 15% decline in university enrollment this Fall semester. For students who are on the waiting list, you can take this opportunity to write a follow-up email to the schools saying that you’re still interested in them. With measures like Tuition Fee Payment in installments and schools fighting for your dollars, you can ask for better financial aid and play one against the other.

Recently, the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) has settled on a lawsuit with the Department of Justice (DOJ) on previous deposits and changing schools. That means if you’re unsure about a few schools, you can reconsider them and take time to explore more options while your deposit is already paid. However, we insist that you receive only one I20 to maintain trust.

UC drops SAT and ACT requirement for residents of CA
There’s been an ongoing debate for a number of years whether the aptitude tests, such as SAT and ACT, are biased in favor of the wealthy. Critics have maintained that the low-income students do not have the money, and consequently access, to the best aptitude test prep that their well-to-do counterparts do. This, they claim, has disadvantaged minorities, particularly the Blacks and Mexicans among others. As a result, these students are unable to gain admission to good universities. The COVID pandemic has only made matters worse. Responding to this long-living controversy and taking into account the hardships imposed by Covid-19, The University of California has removed the requirement of SAT or ACT for the residents of its state. Please note that this new policy does not apply to out-of-state students or to international students. There is a discussion about UC coming up with a better testing methodology, perhaps by 2023; we just need to wait and see.

A total of 51 universities have suspended the standardized examination requirement and are trying to make it optional for competitive students. If you’re confused about taking the exam, we suggest you go for it, as you’ll have the chance to explore more universities with better scores. SAT online registrations are set to open by July 2020, while its rival ACT is being conducted on June 13. SAT is scheduled in August.

A message for the incoming 2021 and 2022 international students
If you’re thinking that this pandemic is going to affect your admission, you have help. Uwezo Learning has been in the business for over 10 years. While this particular pandemic is new to all, we have seen ups and downs in the college admissions process due to other reasons. Talk to us and get a free 30-minute counseling session about what you should do. Don’t throw away your dreams; speak to the masters and get the facts straight. If you’re a 12th grader, you need to jump on this – send an email to info@uwezolearning.com for a free consultation and peace of mind.